The Widower’s Journey – New Book Gives Men a Playbook to Restart Their Lives

The Widower's Journey

The Widower’s Journey guidebook fills an important gap in the self-help genre by addressing how widowers can move through their grief and start over after the death of their wives.

Upon the passing of my wife, Michelle, I was shocked when I couldn’t find any books to help me deal with my grief, and to manage day-to-day challenges. I was devastated and searching for reasons and ways to want to go on living,” said author Herb Knoll.

The Widower’s Journey: Helping Men Rebuild After Their Loss, addresses the needs of the 2.7 million widowers in the U.S., and even more worldwide. The guidebook fills an important gap in the self-help genre by addressing how widowers can move through their grief and start over after the death of their wives. Written by retired bank executive turned widowers’ advocate, Herb Knoll, with contributor sociologist Deborah Carr, Ph.D., and Editor Robert L. Frick, the 226-page book is available in paperback, Kindle, tablet, smartphone and computer versions from Amazon.

“Upon the passing of my wife, Michelle, I was shocked when I couldn’t find any books to help me deal with my grief, and to manage day-to-day challenges,” said Knoll. “I wanted a guide on how I could survive, after losing my love to pancreatic cancer in 2008. I was devastated and searching for reasons and for ways to want to go on living. I set about creating that resource for others, and after nine years it’s aptly titled The Widower’s Journey.”

During his 30+ years as a bank executive, Knoll was known as a man who could get things done. Yet, the death of his wife stopped him in his tracks. The more Knoll learned about the plight of fellow widowers, from their high suicide rates to physical and emotional problems; the more he was driven to write a guidebook to serve them. With 420,000 new widowers in the U.S. each year, Knoll felt someone needed to write a book for them, and that person was him.

After nine years of research and writing, The Widower’s Journey has evolved into THE resource for helping men transition after the death of their spouse. Knoll reached out to more than 40 widowers, a team of 15 subject matter experts, including Dr. Deborah Carr, former chair of Sociology department at Rutgers University and interim director of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research. All agreed the loss of a spouse is a life-changing event, one that deeply affects widowers until they heal and learn to adjust.

“It’s a fact, men tend to suffer alone. Early on they were told boys don’t cry. As a result, widowers tend to hold everything in and that’s how the trouble begins,” says Dr. Carr, who joins the faculty of Boston University this summer. “This…

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